Art in the Library

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The art in the Glenn McNairy Branch represents our past and future, both literally and figuratively. Much of the work has an element of community connection and the artists are involved in making art for and with the public.

 painting art mcnairy house

 
The McNairy House, Susan Harrell

The McNairy House represents the original homestead of the McNairy family built in the 1760s that may have once stood where the library stands now. It is an homage to the family that donated the land and enriched the community through education and engagement. The original Francis McNairy log house can be visited at the Greensboro Historical Museum, where it was moved in 1967.

Susan Harrell is a painter and muralist from Asheboro. She paints in a super-realistic style with heightened colors and contrast. Her striking works emphasize the beauty in everyday life.

Boat, Matt Casto

The rusted metal welded into graceful shapes of sculpture in the reading garden evokes a music note as well as a boat with unfurled sail. This duality echoes the many facets of the library. The sculpture is placed in our outdoor reading garden, surrounded by pavers purchased by friends and supporters of the library. It can also be seen from most sitting areas within the library.

Matt Casto is a recent graduate of East Carolina University and has worked with community groups teaching and guiding others to create art.

 sculpture
 collaborative art

 

Page Ahead, Leslie Scott

Page Ahead speaks to the ways in which libraries cultivate learning through books and information. From encouraging a love of reading at a young age with our early literacy programs to fostering lifelong learning through access to technology and classes.

Leslie Scott is a collaborative artist living in Charlotte. She works with organizations to create art to enhance utilitarian spaces and engage the community.

Over a five month period, Scott worked with students at three neighboring schools to create textured ceramic elements for the mosaics and preparing the many substrate panels needed to create the multi-layered effect. Once the mosaic was set, she brought the panels back into the schools where the students completed the final grouting. On-site panel installation and "stitching together" of the mosaic to eliminate the grid between panels was then completed by Scott.